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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok..a followup post to my other one.

My car is a 93 vtec w/ 67k miles.

I've been keeping my eye on everything that COULD go wrong or haven't been replaced.

One of them is the clutch master cylinder.

I know that the rubber grommet looking thing that surrounds the thin metal cylinder that goes in and out of the firewall should be dry. But it's slowly leaking what appears to be clutch fluid(one reason why I had doubts about this being clutch fluid was becuz it was brown, and my reservoir showed dark orange..till I bled the sucka and brown liquid came out).

How much time do i have left and is this something that can/should be done at home?

Thanks in advance.

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what? I have 158K miles on my 93vtec and the
clutch master cylinder is still "working".
although, the dealer said that it was leaking but I intented to drive it until the **** breaks down.
good idea or bad idea anyone ?
 
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Well, just keep a cell phone with you.


The leaking problem can go one day from a small leak, to:

You come out to the parking lot, see the brown fluid all over the ground, get in, push the clutch down, and it doesn't come back up. You're stuck in the middle of nowhere, with no way to get home.


Replacing things that leak are always good. I would not recommend doing this one yourself unless you know what you are doing. This is one of those things that you take to a shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by malken00:
Well, just keep a cell phone with you.


The leaking problem can go one day from a small leak, to:

You come out to the parking lot, see the brown fluid all over the ground, get in, push the clutch down, and it doesn't come back up. You're stuck in the middle of nowhere, with no way to get home.


Replacing things that leak are always good. I would not recommend doing this one yourself unless you know what you are doing. This is one of those things that you take to a shop.
</font>

Wise words Malken.

I just talked to a friend who is an ex-honda tech and he told me that once the master cylinder develops a leak of any kind/amount, there's no telling when it's gona go.

Hehe..I guess you'd be lucky if the mast cyl goes on you while you're parked. Diff story if it goes while driving.


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These things are dirt-ass cheap, if you see a leak you should go ahead and replace it or rebuild it (kits are even cheaper). There are no special tools needed, but you will need to (obviously) bleed the system afterwards.

If you can bleed the system you can do the swap. I recommend a Helm's manual to go with it. Stick with Honda parts, too, sometimes the generics aren't even compatible (found this out the hard way on my truck).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well, they going for aoub $80 at www.hondaautomotiveparts.com

and I've read and heard that when your master cyl goes, your slave will soon follow. Maybe I should get both.

as for the master cylinder install, is it pretty much a matter of taking out the old an putting in the new? man.. i need a helms.

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by johnsoncranium:
well, they going for aoub $80 at www.hondaautomotiveparts.com

and I've read and heard that when your master cyl goes, your slave will soon follow. Maybe I should get both.

as for the master cylinder install, is it pretty much a matter of taking out the old an putting in the new? man.. i need a helms.

</font>
I'm surprised they are so high. Seriously, check into a rebuild kit. Usually what goes are the seals. Rebuilding consists of removing it, removing the seals, sanding the bore, then putting in the new seals and putting it back together. Easy.

R/R is easy for both. As simple as two bolts, the fitting for the line, then tightening the two bolts & fitting and then bleeding. Very easy, done it before in about a half hour. Have someone on hand to help you bleed, though I've done that on my own, too.

Oh, and I would probably spring for both, especially if you rebuild them yourself. It's a small price for "insurance." What usually causes them to go is crap in the fluid. It's not that the master causes the slave to fail, it's that the crap in the line that causes one to leak can also make the other leak. Us a good fluid (pref. synthetic) and flush it a minimum of every 30k miles or every year. When the stuff breaks down, that's what usually causes a failure (or leaking).
 
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