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Sup everyone, Just wondering if this flywheel from UR is any good as in strength and quality. Also if its a good flywheel where can I find one to order from? Which should I get.....the UR or the JUN flywheel?

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2000 Prelude Type SH
Premium Pearl White

MODS: AEM CAI, DC Header, Greddy PE Exhaust, Vitek Wires, AEM CamGears, AEM TruPwr Pulleys, UR Crank Pulley, Apexi V-AFC, ACT XT Clutch, DC ShortShift Adaptor, ZEX 55 Shot Nitrous

V-Spec Coilovers, DC Fr. Upper Strut Bar, CarbonFiber Hood, OEM Bodykit, 17" Nippon Racing/NittoNT555ZRs, Type S shiftknob........
 

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Im sure the quality is good. Just remember though, when you change it, you will be losing some torque...


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If you only knew the power of the Lude...
'98 Red Base Prelude
"Straights are for fast cars. Turns are for fast drivers." - SCCA Solo2
AEM CAI, APEX-i VAFC, Neuspeed Ft Up Strut Bar, 28 mm Neuspeed RR Sway Bar, Neuspeed Sport Springs, Koni Yellows, and SH RR Deck installed. Shock knock cure done. Installing Quaife ATB Differential.
 

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Well, not really. Since the flywheel is now lightened, it will carry less inertia or store less energy, which is why we have a flywheel in a car. The engine can not produce enough power for variations in power requirements, thus it is stored in the fly wheel. If you had two identical cars, and they went up a hill, but one had the lightened fly wheel, that car would need to either supply more gas to keep up or it simply would not keep up because of the loss in torque. Hope this helps, just a quick explaination.


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If you only knew the power of the Lude...
'98 Red Base Prelude
"Straights are for fast cars. Turns are for fast drivers." - SCCA Solo2
AEM CAI, APEX-i VAFC, Neuspeed Ft Up Strut Bar, 28 mm Neuspeed RR Sway Bar, Neuspeed Sport Springs, Koni Yellows, and SH RR Deck installed. Shock knock cure done. Installing Quaife ATB Differential.
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Darth Luder:
Well, not really. Since the flywheel is now lightened, it will carry less inertia or store less energy, which is why we have a flywheel in a car. The engine can not produce enough power for variations in power requirements, thus it is stored in the fly wheel. If you had two identical cars, and they went up a hill, but one had the lightened fly wheel, that car would need to either supply more gas to keep up or it simply would not keep up because of the loss in torque. Hope this helps, just a quick explaination.


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I thought the revs would go up quicker but would also drop quicker. So tell me, why buy a lightened flywheel?
 

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SH22A4,

R-U happy with your Zex kit. How long have you had that kit on your lude. I'm very interrested by that Zex kit...but still a bit worried. 55 shot is safe?!
 

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Just for that, to get your revs quicker and get up in the higher HP band faster.

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If you only knew the power of the Lude...
'98 Red Base Prelude
"Straights are for fast cars. Turns are for fast drivers." - SCCA Solo2
AEM CAI, APEX-i VAFC, Neuspeed Ft Up Strut Bar, 28 mm Neuspeed RR Sway Bar, Neuspeed Sport Springs, Koni Yellows, and SH RR Deck installed. Shock knock cure done. Installing Quaife ATB Differential.
 

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Something to remember when going to a lighten'd flywheel is the rpms will drop like a rock when you touch the clutch.

Especially if you get the ultra light flywheel.

In my opinion, you may not want to go so light if you plan to attend drags and such. The rpms will drop before you can get it in the next gear... thus dropping you out of the powerband and vtec.
 

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Thats a good point. I think where they are most advantageous is where you need a fast accelleration like on an autox track or a road course, but then you dont want to go too light there either... ;)
 
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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Darth Luder:
Thats a good point. I think where they are most advantageous is where you need a fast accelleration like on an autox track or a road course, but then you dont want to go too light there either...
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Just keep your foot on the gas a bit to keep revs up!

My 8 lb. Fidanza works very nicely. I love it!

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Billy
North Texas Prelude Owners Group
www.ntpog.org
 

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well, if your car is a daily driver, and you have lots of city driving especially during office hours, getting too light a flywheel will be a pain in the butt as the revs would drop too fast, and you have to keep "vroom vroom" to move (ppl will be looking at you wierdly). Of course there are some people that dun mind this setup, but for most people, its not that convenient. Getting a lightened flywheel will cause the revs to rise up faster (good since vtec kicks in past 5k), but will also drop faster. This will not be that big of a problem if you shift fast. Also, its best to get the Chromoly steel FWs that companies like JUN offers. Though it does not happen every single time, aluminiu flywheels are known to warp and even shatter (bringing out your legs or crotch along). A 11 or 12 lb FW would make a big difference from stock.

[This message has been edited by DNA_Cyan (edited April 12, 2001).]
 

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what myths? a lightened flywheel will cause a)revs to increase faster b)revs to decrease faster and c)less apparent torque at the very low end.

<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by baked:
Wow, I'm amazed at the responses that show up whenever a question like this is asked.

It's funny and sad at the same time to see some of these myths get perpetuated.
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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by schwett:
what myths? a lightened flywheel will cause a)revs to increase faster b)revs to decrease faster and c)less apparent torque at the very low end.

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anyone?? baked??

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It seems simple to me. A heavy flywheel is going to resist acceleration, either speeding up or slowing down. Car makers do it so that the engine has some momentum when trying to start the car and when first taking off in gear and so the single blast of energy from the piston explosion gets smoothed out so you don't have terrible vibration. Look at the flywheel on really old steam engines. They're HUGE, and despite steam engines having huge amounts of power, it takes them forever to get up to speed because of the flywheel. I've seen a restored one in action, with no load, only the engine turning the flywheel. They have thousands of horsepower once they are moving, but trying to accelerate them takes forever since it has to use so much energy to turn that monster flywheel. By the same token, slowing it down takes forever. For them it's useful because they want the engine to maintain as constant a speed as possible regardless of the load. In a car, you only want that when you are cruising on the highway or trying to bring the car into motion from a standstill without stalling the engine. It's true a lighter flywheel doesn't add tourque to the engine. What it does is lessen the amount of energy the engine has to use turning the rest of the drivetrain, and so the effect will be more tourque at the wheels, it will have a greater ability to accelerate the wheels than before. That's how I've always understood it.
 

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Well, coming from someone that ACTUALLY has BOTH the UR pullies set and the JUN reg. light FW on their Lude, I can offer some opinions on this...

Your car will rev up quicker, but not a drastic difference(like you will not have to worry about bouncing off the rev limiter or anything).

Also, the revs don't really drop off "a cliff" wither, but do not hang around like stock. Also, the JUN FW (11 lbs.) is so easy to drive daily...never have problems at all.

Both are good mods, but the UR set is by far a better "bang-for-the-buck" mod over the fly- plus the FW will be hella expensive to install compared to the UR's, and the UR's are cheaper. I would get them nwow, and wait until you change clutches to put in the fly. I doubt that the ultra lightweight JUN FW is that much harder to drive, as it is only 1 lb. lighter(and $50 more) than the regular one.

BTW< if interested in a UR pulley SET, email me, as my practically new ones are for sale, with the correct belts, for a good price..

"[email protected]"

-Love to keep them, but don't want to chance ANYTHING with my turbo kit, plus I am trying to save up for internals and that Zdyne SECU if it ever comes out.
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by DNA_Cyan:
Though it does not happen every single time, aluminiu flywheels are known to warp and even shatter (bringing out your legs or crotch along).

[This message has been edited by DNA_Cyan (edited April 12, 2001).]
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Damn, that's kinda scary... any truth to that???

Could anyone go over the advantages/disadvantages of chromoly vs. aluminum flywheels?
 

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Like gludeous said, the lightened flywheel will add torque to the wheels not to the motor...giving you more power off the line with the drawback being the lightened wheel doesn't have enough inertia to maintain high rpms between shifts.

btw, the flywheel taking out your legs...not likely in the prelude, maybe in an s2000, cuz the lude FW spins in the same plane as the length of the car...closer to the passenger side...so watch out who you drive.
 
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