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Ok please dont flame because i have searched this board and some others but havent really come across what i'm looking for

To properly build up your engine for FI...

What are all the necessary steps in order?

I assume the first step would be to send your block somewhere to get it resleeved (GE, AEBS ,etc)

Would forged pistons/rods be installed after you get your block back? or does GE do it for you? or do you have to find a local machine shop to take care of it?

After you get your block back, what's the purpose of honing, balancing, blueprinting ...etc... Is there anything you would have to do to 'prep' the sleeves before putting the whole block back together?

The reason i ask all this is because im confused as to why a whole build up costs so much...getting the bottom end resleeved seems to be around 900....im not sure about the rest but i get scared because costs come out to like 9000 for some people...i realize that includes a whole turbo setup too, but it still seems like a lot and id just like to get an idea where all the costs are coming from.

Thanks for your time
 

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I assume the first step would be to send your block somewhere to get it resleeved (GE, AEBS ,etc).
Correct.

Would forged pistons/rods be installed after you get your block back? or does GE do it for you? or do you have to find a local machine shop to take care of it?
GE will do this for you as long as you send them the pistons but you can have a local shop do this as well.

After you get your block back, what's the purpose of honing, balancing, blueprinting ...etc... Is there anything you would have to do to 'prep' the sleeves before putting the whole block back together?
The sleeves need to be bored and honed to get proper tolerances for the pistons. Balancing is I believe just making sure everything is turning/spinning ok at high rpm. They make sure everything is is weighted the same to keep anything from being off center (don't quote me on this one). The crank is micropolished and balanced as well if you so desire.

Well the shop would do everything for you so there is no real prep for the sleeves after they are put in except for the boring and honing to make sure the pistons fit correctly.
 

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the obvious part : first, you take the entire motor out of the car. then you strip it to pieces, taking the head off, the accessories off, the timing belt, the water pump, the oil pump, the balance shafts, the oil pan, the main bearing cap/bridge, the bearings, the crank, and the pistons.

now, to elaborate a bit on what anubyss said:

the basic goal in "building" your motor is to make it stronger. on our motors, the pistons are the weakest part, so you want stronger pistons. while your at it, you want stronger rods. forged is stronger than cast. while the block itself is not that weak the cylinders are unfortunatley made of a material which will probably cause problems with those stronger forged pistons. so you get the block "sleeved," which is the process of replacing the cylinders.

when GE sleeves a block, they take the whole thing and drill out the existing cylinders. then they fit much stronger steel sleeves in in place of the ones they just removed. they also laterally brace the sleeves against the rest of the block.

after the block is sleeved, the cylinders need to be made the correct size for your pistons. this is called boring. they drill holes in the new sleeves to the proper size and with the exact spacing. the next step, honing, is cutting a very fine crosshatch pattern into the inside walls of the cylinder sleeves which helps the piston rings control the oil coming up from the crank case and squirters.

the weights of the new pistons and rods are different than the old ones. ideally, you would balance the entire rotating assembly including the flywheel, but it's not necessary. polishing the crank makes it's surface smoother, which reduces the rotation friction against the oil in the crankcase. there are also other processes that can make your crank stronger, or reduce it's resistance further (knife edging.)

after this is done, the pistons, rings, rods, and crankshaft need to be put back in the block. the bearings which go between the crankshaft and the block will be replaced. in most cases, the main bore of the block (which is where the crank sites) and the bearing caps will need to be machined as well, since the sleeving process twists the block up a bit. this is done, bearings of the proper thickness are selected, and the block is reassembled.

the head goes on the block next, and a possible area of concern here is the joint between the two. very high levels of power can blow the gasket between the head and the block. when the block is sleeved, the sleeves can be set to stick up slightly from the deck of the block, which will result in a very tight combustion or "fire seal" against the head. another way to acheive this is with a headgasket that has a thickened fire ring, such as cometic's turbo gasket. these gaskets also come in varying thicknesses should you want to raise or lower compression.

the head itself need to be held onto the block, which is what head studs or bolts do. a serious rebuild will replace the honda head bolts with ARP head studs (now that they're finally available!!!!)

the valvetrain in the head itself can also be strengthened, but i don't know anything about that. :)
 

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Nice post schwett. you really broke it down for us :bigthumb:
I was considering having my crank knife edged but was told that it's not recomended for a street car. Do you know why? :bigthumb:
 

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Knife-edging will reduce the counterweights on the crank. If the same amount is removed on each one, and the crank re-balanced it won't vibrate more nor significantly increase engine noise but because the reciprocating masses (pistons, rods) are not necessarily lighter when upgraded from cast to forged, stress (and therefore, wear) on the crank and rod bearings will increase with the corresponding effect on engine longevity.
 

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This is what I was charged to *fix* my car. Already had sleeves...

Engine Swap 637.50
Assembly Charge 500.00
Boil/Clean Block 75.00
Bearings Rods& Mains 200.00
Headgasket 85.00
Oil Pump 140.00
Eagle Rods 500.00
H22 Crank (Mine was damaged) 600.00
Hone & Bore 150.00
Turbo Mani (Custom, very nice yet simple) 550.00
Turbonetics T60-1 (VERY GOOD DEAL) 925.00
Arias 9-1 Pistons 450.00
Rings 100.00
Press Pistons to Rods 65.00
Battery (Optima) 60.00
Holley FPR 245.00
Labor - 8 hours (General)wiring cleanup, fix V-Tec, Install Turbo parts, relocate oil line, clean parts, fix throttle position sensor, Make 3" Downpipe 50/hr 400.00

Fittings Fuel Reg, Hose, etc... 48.50
Timing Belt Timing belt tensioner 20.00
Holley Anihalator Wires 75.00
T-Bolt QTY-8 10/pr 80.00
Deltagate Flange QTY-2 45/pr 90.00
ATR Intank Pump 200.00
Labor 1.5Hrs 50/Hr 75.00
NGK 4554 Plugs 25.00
Oil man oil dump man 35.00
Lower Rad Hose 20.00
Alternator Belt 17.89
Dist Cap Distributer Cap for External Coil 20.00
Rotor Rotor for Dist. 18.15
Dyno Time Dyno Tuning Accel DFI EMS 400.00

SUBTOTAL 6807.04
TAX 178.79
TOTAL 6985.83
 

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i believe you're right about the sleeve material.

the crank spins around in the bottom of the block, or rather between the bottom of the block and the bearing caps. the tolerances are very crucial. when you sleeve the block, it distorts it enough that the crank and bearings no longer sit perfectly in the block. line boring is drilling out along the length of the bottom of the block and bearing caps so that it's all in a perfect line again, ready for new bearings and the crank.

kingxsquid said:
GE uses ductile iron not steel right? and also, what is meant by line boring and why is it needed?

thanks again
 

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I believe this is faq'able
 
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