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ok, i was thinking i just needed to get some eibach springs to lower my car, do i also need struts? what do struts do anyway and if i just get eibach springs which lower 1.3" all around and replace them will that be cool? i mean for $240 or so plus $60 labor to have them installed $300 dont seem that bad. please someone clear this all up for me wit needing springs + struts. thanx!

p.s. i forgot to mention, shocks also ..

-kevin

[This message has been edited by zentron (edited April 30, 2001).]
 

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Your "damper" assembly consists of the spring over the strut (coil-over). Your choice, when it comes to lowering, is to replace the spring, the strut, both (a complete suspension kit like the Mugen or Tein), or get a "coil-over kit" which has a threaded body.

Essentially you need to change the free length of the whole assembly. This is usually done by replacing the spring with a shorter (lowering) spring. Quite often the spring has an increased "rate" or stiffness. For reference, the stock spring rate (front) on a 5th gen is 180 pounds/inch (I think). That's the amount of weight required to deflect the spring one inch. Most lowering springs like the Eibach increase it by, say, 20% or more, though that's up to the manufacturer. Neuspeed Race springs increase by about 100%, Tanabe Super H by 30%... you just need to talk to people and find out what's "right." Stiffer springs are better for improved handling, though you ideally want to match the strut's valving (stiffness) to the spring. Stiffer springs mean a harsher ride on the street.

You can also lower with the strut by changing where the spring sits on the strut. Struts like Koni Sports ("yellows") have an adjustable perch that will allow you to lower the car with a stock spring by changing where it sits and "precompressing" it. Since the Konis are also adjustable for rebound, you can stiffen the ride as well.

A "coil over kit" that contains a threaded body (like Ground Control) gives you an adjustable perch on which you use a "standardized" spring like the Eibach Race Spring (ERS). The standardization allows you to specify your spring rate and/or swap springs to your liking. Most racers go this route as the threaded body gives you infinite adjustability (within the limit of the suspension & body) and allows you to specify the rate, which most racers make VERY stiff. Note that this is basically a "spring" kit and you still need to buy struts.

As I mentioned, the spring and strut need to be somewhat matched. Not only will Eibach Prokits ride "bouncy" on a stock strut, they will also wear the stock strut out faster. Expect a stock strut to last no more than 50k miles on and aftermarket spring. This can also be downright dangerous on a very stiff spring like the Neuspeed race.

Hope that helps. Hope it gets FAQ'd, too...
 

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hmm i'm a little confused... should the word "strut" be replaced with "shocks or damper" ?


or ... if not, whats the diff between the two then?
 

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<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jkoc:
hmm i'm a little confused... should the word "strut" be replaced with "shocks or damper" ?

or ... if not, whats the diff between the two then?
</font>
A shock and strut are essentially the same (in terms of function), the construction is just different. They shouldn't be used interchangeably (since our cars have struts) but often are.

The damper assembly is the spring/strut combo. "Damper" is often also used interchangeably with "strut" and "shock."
 
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