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Well, every 4th Sunday of the month, we have autocrossing here.

I was wonder if you could tell me how my car would perform and if I should change/add anything that would be SUPER essential.

Here's what I have right now:
* AEM Short Ram Intake
* Goodyear Eagle GTII with around 24K miles on em (still oh-so-easy to chirp :D)
* Stock Prelude Si Rims

Pressure ideas? Is a strut bar necessary?

Tucson, AZ can get pretty damn hot, and I'm doing this in a parking lot with cones :p
 

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wasting my youth
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Probably not so well.... consider shocks/springs/strut bars/sway bars/wider and lighter rims/better tires
 

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Outside of tires (get Azenis, KDs, MXs, etc), worry about your driving first. Take it from me, and others that have autocrossed for years...though mods will help you somewhat, I got better by simply NOT modding my car for a long time, and concentrated on my driving.
 

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wasting my youth
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True true Jacques... but he asked how his CAR will perform in autox, not how HE will perform. :p

While driving skill will probably have the greatest influence, the setup he described is really not too hot from a car perspective.
 

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I agree with Jacques, work on your driving first. Your car will handle well out of the box if you know how to drive it well, which comes with time. There are guys out there that could take a stock car and beat a modified car with a less experienced driver at the controls... ;) Once you get into how to drive better and want to get more competative, then you will know what mods to do that will help your driving style.

Tire pressures should be bumped up, depending on your tires I think a good place to start would be 42 front and 38 rear or something similar. Then you can play with them more when you get a feel for how the car is reacting to those pressures, but that wont come right away either, probably in future events you could mess with them.
 

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sportin' the 4x4....
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As mentioned above, you don't need anything on that car besides some experience behind the wheel. :) If you start changing thing on the car once a month it becomes harder to learn how the car reacts.
 

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why do you have higher pressure in the front??
doesnt higher pressure cause less traction in the front and more traction in the rear since less pressure?... doesnt the prelude understeer stock?
The reason I ask is have you guys ever done rc racing.... if you have more traction in front tires your back will slide out before the front.. so just wondering
 

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Take off your AEM intake and put your stock one back on so that your car will be eligable for G Stock. Drive in G Stock for at least one year and improve your driving skills. Then you can evaluate what class path you want to persue and start prepping your car for - Stock, STS, SP, etc.

In any racing (other than drag racing), you run higher tire pressures to reduce sidewall flex and reduce tire rollover.

Andrew
 

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dchung1 said:
The reason I ask is have you guys ever done rc racing.... if you have more traction in front tires your back will slide out before the front.. so just wondering
Yes, I have raced RC cars before (back in 1997 and early part of 1998). When I first started auto-x in November 1998, I used the same concept to setup my car. But until later part of last year, I went to higher tire pressures in the front and lower in the rear and I liked it. So now I'm sticking with it. But my pressure differential is more than just 2 psi. I put 40psi front and 32-34psi rear.

Oh...just to point out some differences between an RC car and a real car (like our Preludes). Almost all RC cars are AWD (except the Tamiya and Yokomo which have FF configurations) but our Preludes are FF.
 

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Yes, the fwd is a difference and the weight of the car is a major factor as well. Also, when you bump up your pressures, you are flattening out the tire's contact patch (to a point of course). Unless you run crazy high up front you will get more traction. I too ran more of a difference on my street tires, but thought I would not tell him to go too much of a differential to keep it more safe. I finally wound up having 42-44 up front and 34-36 in the rear and that worked well for me even on the stock tires.
 

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I ran similar pressure on stock sized tires (actually 44-46 and 36-38). I'd have to agree with everyone here. The modifications don't make you all that much faster and it's easy to hide driving mistake with them (since you appear faster). If I had to do it all over again, I'd run in Gstock! It certainly is cheaper.

I've heard good things about the Evolution schools ($200/session) but your local SCCA region might have some cheaper alternatives. I've been to a few driving schools and highly recommend them. They'll make the initial part of the learning curve go pretty fast.
 
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