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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, suggestions on which lightened flywheel to get.
Any info on pricing and performance gains would be much appreciated.
I'm not too familiar with these things so bascially any info would help.

Also, where to get it from.
If possible, I would like a local store where I could pick it up for a good price. (SF Bay Area) But if its cheaper to order online, then I can do that too.
I need it ASAP as I'm getting my clutch changed now and need to get the flywheel to the shop with in two weeks.

Thanks guys!
=o)
 
G

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Fidanza.

Buy it direct (www.aluminumflywheels.com) or buy it on a group buy.

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Billy
North Texas Prelude Owners Group
www.ntpog.org
 

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I have a CM 10 lb flywheel, very happy with it. It ran $377 with my discount through NOPI.
 

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I bought the Fidanza. I'd also consider the Clutchmaster. Redline has a groupbuy going on the CM for $310 shipped. If you call them, I believe they'll sell you a Fidanza for $320 shipped... their price just went up a little on that one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply guys.

Any difference between the Clutchmaster one and the Fidanza one?
Or are they pretty much the same?
 

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I would NOT buy an 8 lb flywheel imo. You will feel like you are driving a B16A powered Prelude. I noticed a loss in torque even with my mildly lightened ACT unit.

Just my $.02

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95 Prelude VTEC
 

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shouldn't a lightened fly actually increase torque once you get rolling? i know that the stored momentum of a heavier flywheel will give you more torque right as you let the clutch out, but after that isn't the engine simply doing extra work to turn the heavier flywheel? i thought that, when rolling, the flywheel is just dead weight.

<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Mike95lude:
I would NOT buy an 8 lb flywheel imo. You will feel like you are driving a B16A powered Prelude. I noticed a loss in torque even with my mildly lightened ACT unit.

Just my $.02

</font>
 

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I see the term torque getting used incorrectly again. Regardless, it's simple... less weight equals better performance.

I don't care if you're lightening your pistons, rods, crank, flywheel, axles, brake rotors, wheels, tires, whatever... lighter is better. The only difference in weight before the clutch and weight after the clutch is the effect it will have on clutch engagement. Less weight (and therefore momentum) before the clutch will mean it's easier to stall the car upon engagement. I'm not sure why everyone is having such a hard time grasping the lighter is better concept. As stated before on this board (and quite recently) the momentum of a heavy flywheel is only useful for drag launches with slicks under specific circumstances...

For my disclaimer, I should point out that I'm talking specifically about full power acceleration and am ignoring things like the effects of lightened engine components on overall balance and longevity.
 

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I think the off the line you will lose torque but once you are off, the acceleration gain offsets the loss in torque. I really don't know how this would affect a 0-60 run but 1/4 mile times should be better with a lightened flywheel. It would be interesting get some real numbers.

I don't really feel the torque loss with my fidanza flywheel on the butt dyno.
 

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man i think you guys are backwards! if you have a lighter flywheel then there is less inertia to turn it from a dead stop.. i mean same for wheels for example you have a really light wheel and a really heavy one the really light one is a lot easier to get turning then the heavy one!! and momentum really doesn't play a part becuase it is constantly being turned by your motor its not like it gets it turning then is expected to turn for as long as it can! take a physics class guys sheesh! hehe just kiddin..
 

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no, i don't have it "backwards." you're oversimplifying! the lighter flywheel will be easier to get moving, and will have less stored energy once it is turning. when your engine is idling, some of that otherwise wasted energy is going into rotating the flywheel. when you let off the clutch, the stored energy in the flywheel helps cause the car to move forward. if you completely disconnected the engine from the flywheel, and then let up on the clutch, the car would move forward a bit. it would move forward less with a lighter flywheel. once you're moving, though, the weight of the flywheel is completely parasitic as far as i can tell.

<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by LakeMountLude:
man i think you guys are backwards! if you have a lighter flywheel then there is less inertia to turn it from a dead stop.. i mean same for wheels for example you have a really light wheel and a really heavy one the really light one is a lot easier to get turning then the heavy one!! and momentum really doesn't play a part becuase it is constantly being turned by your motor its not like it gets it turning then is expected to turn for as long as it can! take a physics class guys sheesh! hehe just kiddin..</font>
 

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and to take it a bit further than just "idling," imagine when you're launching for a drag race or 1/4 run. you've revved up to 4500RPM, but you're still stopped. the 20 lb flywheel is turning at 4500RPM. that is some significant stored energy that will combat the tendency of the engine to bog and drop out of the RPM range you want it to be in.

i still think i want to get a lightened fly though, because the moment the tire speed is matched to the flywheel / engine speed, that weight is just extra driveline drag. i can't do the math at the moment but there should be a direct correlation between the difference in weights of the flywheel and your torque at the wheels. you just need the overall gearing and the moment of inertia of a flywheel.
 

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oooo look what i started

Anyways, yes I know that it helps all out performance but you lose the "torquey" feel of your car. The momentum generated from the stock flywheel helps if you want to be light on the gas, in stop and go and so forth.

In all honesty though I don't have much experience with my lightened flywheel yet. I have only put 200 miles on it, meaning 300 more for clutch break-in. I haven't floored it or gone into VTEC yet



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95 Prelude VTEC

[This message has been edited by Mike95lude (edited May 02, 2001).]
 

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A lightened flywheel will help performance overall (not by much) and will be easier to use on open track events for it's ability to rev match easier, and a little faster acceleration. Unless you have slicks or something that will really make your car hook up to the ground the stock or heavier flywheel will not help performance since there's literally NO WAY that you're going to rev the car up to 5000 RPMs and just drop it and get consistant traction w/o slicks.
~Doug
 

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hmm, well all this talk about stored momentum and stuff... relize also that when you shift between gears ( while racing ) a lightened flywheel doesn't have as much momentum as a heavier flywheel, get my drift? Same concept...

But I dunno, I like everything about my fidanza 'cept for that thing where the rpm's will just drop like a rock when shifting and the car will bog sometimes. A little nitrous solves that issue though
 

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Schwett has it right. You do lose your stored momentum and energy in a lightened flywheel. This is where the torque and power come from when measured off of the wheels. The internal combustion engine does not make the power needed to sustain your car and handle variable power requirements. It would bog down all of the time. This is why you have a flywheel in the car, to store energy when needed. Another reason that there is a measurement of power off of the flywheel. If you lighten it, the only real advantage is to get into your upper rpms faster, which can be advantageous if you have an all high end set up like a lot of members here have. But if you want all around power and no loss of torque, then you shouldnt lighten... Internal Combustion Engines class UC
 

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You guys have to decide on what circumstance you're arguing for. Hell, I can argue that 2" wide tires will provide the best performance under a certain circumstance because they'll have less drag. That's totally irrelevant.

Ok, fine, so the flywheel "stores" energy. So would my 20" chrome wheels too, but I don't see anyone rushing out to buy those. For that matter, adding 400lbs of weight to the trunk will give you more momentum. I know this is extreme, but it's exactly the same argument you're making... just blown a little out of proportion.

To be serious though... I still firmly believe that in a full throttle run, (uphill, downhill, into the wind, whatever...) a lighter flywheel will put more horsepower to the wheels than a heavier one. That's my entire statement... if you want more information, go to www.google.com and search for "moment of inertia".

I'm not prepared to discuss the effects it has on a split-second drag launch, as that has nothing whatsoever to do with me.

As for everyday driving... if your car accelerates quicker, it deccelerates quicker as well. Anyone who's gone from heavy to light (or reversed) wheels knows exactly what I'm talking about. It changes driveability. I hope that's not a revelation to any of you.
 

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But then again, I have the CM flywheel, supposed to be between 9-10 lbs. and didn't feel much different than stock. Before I drove home the first day with it, I was already used to it


I hear CM flywheels are down to $250 now.
 
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