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Hi,
I just purchased a new HU, and there are crossover settings that need to be adjusted. It has settings for the different frequency, and then slope.

Also, there are EQ settings. What are the different frequencies. Does anyone have any tips or sites I can read so that I understand what I'm doing?

Any help at all would be appreciated.

Ferrd
 

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I was going to post something, but changed my mind since I'm not really an "expert" or anything, but since no one else will post, I will :). I have an EQ (Pioneer DEQ 7200), and so will tell you what I know:

A crossover point is a point where your speakers will not receive any signals in that frequency; for instance, if your high-pass crossover is set to 85hz, then your speakers won't get any frequencies below 85hz, allowing them to play the upper ranges more efficiently.

Now, those frequencies below 85hz aren't totally cut off, but rather are decreased in volume gradually (i.e., for the above example, 75hz will still play out of your speakers, but 3db lower, then 65hz is 3db lower still, and so forth, until the lowest frequencies are completely cut off). The slope determines the degree to which those frequencies are cut off.

If you have speakers and subwoofers, set your high-point crossover for your speakers at around 85hz and your low-point crossover for your subs at 85hz; you may want to set these higher if your speakers distort easily with bass. This way, your main speakers will concentrate on higher sounds, while your subs take care of the bass. This is more or less how I have mine set up.

Once you have determined which frequencies you want your speakers to play, your EQ can then selectively increase or decrease frequencies to change the sound of your music. Lowest frequencies are for bass, highest are for treble/high-pitched noises. Changing the EQ settings for each frequency will dramatically alter how a song will be heard. For instance, raising the 15000hz frequency will increase the presence of cymbals and whistles, while 50hz will increase bass drums and other low notes. Change these as you like, but bear in mind you really shouldn't just raise all the frequencies; this would be the equivalent of simply raising the volume (not exactly, but almost).

Toy around with the EQ settings to get a feel for how sound is affected. That's the best way to set your stereo just the way you like it.

Hope this helps, if someone else wants to chime in and correct me, please do. :)
 
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