Honda Prelude Online banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 4th Gen and not quite happy with the brake performance. The brake performance data of 70mph-0mph is about 180 feet which I don't think is good enough for a Prelude. The Baer track system has really reasonable price of $695 for a kit. Has anyone experienced with Baer's brake system? Any + and -?? Or any other suggetion to improve brake?
Here is the link to the page http://www.baer.com/products/track.htm



[This message has been edited by dangerzone (edited April 16, 2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
I haven't bought their kit yet, but I will say I've heard nothing but good things about it. It's probably my next upgrade. They're local for me - I live about 20 min from their shop and they have a solid reputation. The Track kit is pretty sweet! Very comprehensive. They quoted me $750 for my 5th gen.

The only thing I would suggest before you buy is contacting them and having them email you the "pattern" so you can be 100% sure they'll fit inside your rims before you have them shipped overseas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just ordered the 17" rim. Hopefully will be here by next week. I already download the template and print it out. Just waiting for the wheels to see if it fits. It's $815 with the crossdrilled zinc washed rotors, and $695 with the standard rotors. Which one should I go with standard or corssdrilled?
BTW, my place is Melbourne Florida not Melbourne Australia.
 
G

·
Too bad you can't use 15" rims with them.

By the way, bigger rotors and calipers will not decrease stopping distance. I know I will get flamed for it, but it's true. If you want to lower your stopping distances, get stickier tires.

------------------
Billy
North Texas Prelude Owners Group
www.ntpog.org
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
LOL! Sorry - I though Melbourne AUS... my bad!

Well... the standard rotor will last the longest & provide the best performance.

Crossdrilling has a few drawbacks and is really a relic from the days where brakepad technology was still behind. The old pads used to outgas in addition to generating dust & heat and so your pad would ride on a cushion of the gas instead of contacting the rotor. Almost like after you drive through a deep puddle and your brakes don't grab.

The cross-drilling let the gas escape but at a price. Cross drilling means less rotor material, hence they can't absorb as much heat, they also have less contact area with the pad and they tend to crack & warp easier. People who get them do so for cosmetic reasons and not performance.

The standard rotor, while not as sexy looking will handle anything you throw at it and last longer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by 71dsp:
By the way, bigger rotors and calipers will not decrease stopping distance. I know I will get flamed for it, but it's true. If you want to lower your stopping distances, get stickier tires.
</font>
why don't bigger rotors and calipers decreace the stopping distance? When I hit the brake, I can feel bite isn't really strong. So what should I do to make the bites feel stronger? Shouldn't 2 piston caliper bites harder than single piston?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,048 Posts
Braking is all about heat dissipation. It converts motion to heat.

Bigger calipers, grippier pads and bigger rotors improve braking distances. Combine those with better tires, and you're set. Billy, if large rotors don't mean much, why does the GS-R stop much better than the Civic Si, and why does the Type R do even better than the GS-R? The only significant differences are rotors and calipers.

Large rotors are also important on race tracks so you can go longer before the rotors become heat-soaked. Once rotors are hot, braking distances get much longer. With a longer braking distance, you have to brake sooner and you lose time.

------------------

<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by atlxchink:
When I try to picture o0OO0o as a moderator, the image of Beavis hacking away at the keyboard comes to mind </font>
 
G

·
Bite is more of a function of the frictional force between the pad and rotor. If you want more bite, try new rotors or new pads. See if your pads and/or rotors are glazed.

If two calipers have the same piston area, it doesn't matter how many pistons a caliper has, the force exerted is the same. Most aftermarket calipers have more pistons to evenly distribute the pressure across the pad. The problem with single piston calipers with large pads is that the backing plate can flex, hence reducing pad efficiency. In that case, more pistons can help, but you aren't increasing the force exerted any. Also, most aftermarket kits are designed to have a total piston area similar to stock so that the stock brake balance does not get thrown off. That's one reason why I think doing the AEM big rotor kit just on the front is a bad idea. It shifts the brake bias to the front too much. Might be okay for a race car, but not for a street car.

If you have enough power to lock the brakes, bigger calipers and/or rotors won't decrease the stopping distances. The main thing are the 4 donuts that connect you to the ground. Tires will affect braking performance just as much as anything else.

What larger rotors and/or calipers do is help consistency. You can stop more reliably, more often. You get less fade, and better modulation (sometimes). Again, this doesn't help stopping distances unless fade is a problem.

------------------
Billy
North Texas Prelude Owners Group
www.ntpog.org
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
Haw Haw!!!
Billy's right!
Overall stopping distance is determined by the tire's "stickyness" to the road. A couple months ago "Grassroots Motorsports" did a great article on brakes, and what it came down to is the tires.

------------------
BRacing
"Going faster since 1994"

"Drag racing is for those that can't steer"
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top